Can’t We Just Get Along? Making SSRS, Power BI and Excel Play Well Together

Please join me and other 2017 PASS Summit speakers for 24 Hours of PASS: Summit Preview on July 19th and 20th.  24HOP is a series of 60 minute on-line sessions presented back-to-back for 24 hours, from the same professionals who will deliver preconference and main conference sessions during the Summit the first week of November this year.  These online sessions are free of charge and normally attended by thousands of individuals to gain insight and knowledge about the topics.  24 Hours of PASS features free educational webinars delivered over 24 hours. Topics covered in this edition include Performance Tuning, SQL Server 2017, Linux, DevOps, Azure, PowerShell, SSRS, Power BI and much more. Browse all sessions. These webinars provide a sneak peek at some of the best practices, expert tips and demos you’ll find at this year’s PASS Summit in Seattle. Continue reading

Modern Reporting with SQL Server 2016 and 2017 Reporting Services full day pre-conference session

I am thrilled to be presenting a full-day preconference session before the PASS Summit, on October 31st.  Please join me for a deep tour of the new capabilities and BI platform integrations for SQL Server Reporting Services 2016 & 2017.  The session will also review the essential skills and tasks to setup and configure the report server and web portal, report design and modern report solution planning. Continue reading

Reporting Services 2016, The Force Awakens session at Summit 2016

THANK YOU…

everyone who attended my session today titled “Reporting Services 2016, The Force Awakens”  We had a packed house with attendees standing along all of the walls in two joining session rooms.  This is indeed a very popular topic!   The session was recorded and will be available to watch with all the Summit 2016 session recordings.  You can download the slides deck here.  Samples and demo material are available from these resources (which are on the References & Sample slide):

Professional Microsoft SQL Server 2016 Reporting Services and Mobile Reports
Amazon (samples)

Self-paced online SSRS 2016 training
EdX course DAT214x: “Analyzing and Visualizing Data with SQL Server Reporting Services”
EdX.org (samples)

The Essential Guide to SQL Server 2016 Reporting Services
SQL Server Pro Magazine / SQLMag.com
Link (samples)

My Blog
SqlServerBiBlog.com

Reporting Services 2016 PowerShell CmdLets

…now that I have your attention…
there aren’t any yet.

We (along with Aaron Nelson, Data Platform MVP & Chrissy LeMaire, PowerShell MVP) are working with the SQL Server product teams to recommend the first set of CmdLets that we would like to see added to the PowerShell libraries.  Please help us by posting comments with your suggestions.  What are the most important SSRS-related tasks that you would like to automate using PS?  Give us your top five or so.

When asked to work on this recommendation, my first thought was to just duplicate the commands that are current exposed by the RE.exe utility.  That might be a good starting point but this effort should be more deliberate than just copying what was evolved through the past product versions.

Hera are a few suggestions to get us started:

Add-RsDataSource
Add-RsReport
Export-RsEncryptionKey
Get-RsAuthentication
Import-RsEncryptionKey
Import-RsServerSettings
New-RsFolder
Remove-RsReport
Set-RsAuthentication
Set-RsDataSource
Set-RsReportDataSource

How to Get SSRS Reports in Excel Without Exporting from Reporting Services

I’ve recently seen a wave of questions from clients and peers about difficulties exporting reports to Excel lately.  Every few weeks I get a call or question about this.  This topic has been a recurring theme for a very long time and one that I have encountered many times over the past – oh, eleven years or more – using SSRS.  Business users like Excel because it’s what they know and they can reformat and manipulate data in a workbook.  People like Reporting Services because all the hard work of connecting to data sources, writing queries, totaling, grouping and formatting the results gets done once and then all they need to do is run the report.  Users want the best of both worlds and they expect that when they export a report to Excel that they should have their cake and eat it.  In other words; they should be able to get a report, with all the goodness of headers, scrolling regions, pagination, interactive sorting – you name it – to work exactly the same way in Excel.  Many improvements have been made to all of the report rendering extensions over the years and the Excel export story is better than ever but here’s the deal – bottom line – the more rich formatting and advanced functionality that gets designed into an SSRS report, the less likely it is to export all that functionality to Excel or any other rendering format. Continue reading