Power BI Data Modeling Sessions

This is going to be a very busy week for presentations Iam presenting with five sessions scheduled on the topic…

Drill-through from Power BI to Paginated Report – Report Recipe #4

Navigation between reports is the hallmark of an interactive reporting solution, enabling the ability to drill-through and see relevant details…

Doing Power BI the Right Way: 6. Validating data model results – Part 2

Moving important business data into a data model for analytic reporting can often be a two-edge sword. Data retrieval is fast and can support all kinds of analytic trending and comparisons. But, data in the model may be one or two layers away from the original source data, making it more challenging to compare with familiar user reports. Often the first validation effort after transforming and loading data into the model and then visualizing the initial results is having a business user say “yeah, that looks about right.” Then, sometime later after more development and extensive user testing, the feedback might be “hmm, that looks a bit off.” …not exactly scientific.

I have been doing a lot of data validation work lately – both formally and informally. Informally: Validating calculation results from a Power BI data model is just a normal part of the development process. Formally: After developing and delivering an entire business dashboard solution, a formal validation process is used to validate the ongoing results after future data refresh cycles and to certify reports so that business leaders know they can trust them.

Doing Power BI the Right Way: 6. Validating data model results – Part 1

Moving important business data into a data model for analytic reporting can often be a two-edge sword. Data retrieval is fast and can support all kinds of analytic trending and comparisons. But, data in the model may be one or two layers away from the original source data, making it more challenging to compare with familiar user reports. Often the first validation effort after transforming and loading data into the model and then visualizing the initial results is having a business user say “yeah, that looks about right.” Then, sometime later after more development and extensive user testing, the feedback might be “hmm, that looks a bit off.” …not exactly scientific.

I have been doing a lot of data validation work lately – both formally and informally. Informally: Validating calculation results from a Power BI data model is just a normal part of the development process. Formally: After developing and delivering an entire business dashboard solution, a formal validation process is used to validate the ongoing results after future data refresh cycles and to certify reports so that business leaders know they can trust them.

Doing Power BI the Right Way

This is an introduction to a series of posts and pages that will provide a comprehensive set of best practices for successful Power BI solutions. In previous posts. Let’s start with a simplified flowchart and condensed decision tree. This first whiteboard drawing is the first half of the Power BI design process, ending with the data model, before measures, visualization and solution delivery. There is a lot more but I think this is a good starting point. Let’s start the conversation here and then I will enhance this post with a more complete list of topics.

How to Assign Pro Licenses to a Power BI Tenant

This is a question that comes up all the time. Power BI licensing is not complicated but a common challenge is that the person who sets up a new Power BI subscription and tenant within an organization is often not the same person who manages Office 365 or Azure service licensing for the organization. I’ve consulted on projects for several organizations where folks just didn’t know who to talk to or how to proceed after testing the water with Power BI. After setting up a new subscription, IT professionals and business data analysist often don’t know how to license Power BI for company use and share reports and datasets with others in the organization.
This post will show you how licenses are assigned to users and, more importantly, what to request from your support desk or administrators who may be unfamiliar with Power BI and Office 365 user licensing. Keep reading for background information about why this is important and necessary.

How to Configure the Power BI Gateway to use Dataset Connection Parameters

A service provider or vendor might want to publish multiple copies of a report that should connect to different database…

Power BI for Grownups

The message from the Microsoft Business Applications Summit this week was very clear: Power BI is growing up. We have…

SQL, M or Dax? – part 2

This is a post about a post about a post. Thanks to those of you who are entering comments in the original May 12 post titled SQL, M or DAX? This is a popular topic. And thanks to Adam Saxton for mentioning this post in his Guy in A Cube Weekly Roundup.

Power BI Global Hackathon Contest Results

The results of last month’s Power BI Global Hackathon are in! The Hackathon was facilitated by our our PUG here…

Keeping Up with Power BI – A Never Ending Story

This first week of the new year has been a lot of housecleaning for me (literally and figuratively…  my office…

Implementing Row-Level Security in Power BI

The best method to implement row-level security in a published Power BI model or SSAS Tabular model consumed from the Power BI service will depend to some degree on your data structure and requirements.  The method I demonstrate here is one of the most flexible approaches and one that I commonly use in my projects.

Microsoft Data Insights Summit Live Streaming & Free Sessions

If you are fortunate enough to be attending the Microsoft Data Insights Summit in Seattle along with about 2,000 others on June 12 & 13, I’ll look forward to seeing you there.  This will be a great community event and a chance to meet, network and learn from well-known speakers, authors and product team leaders responsible for the best data analytics tools in the industry.  The summit has been sold-out for a few weeks.  If you can’t make it to Seattle to be there in person, you can still attend the conference!  I don’t just mean that you can watch a few cherry-picked sessions and keynote addresses…  You can watch every session for free.  Selected sessions, which do include the keynote addresses, will be streamed lived during the conference but all of the sessions are recorded and will be available within two weeks after the last sessions wrap-up on June 13.  This an awesome learning experience.  I will post links and more details here about the recorded sessions after they become available.
If you are going to the summit, please attend my two sessions:

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