Curator’s Corner: December 2019

As I read the many posts from those in the community who I follow, I am reminded that the community brain trust is much greater than any individual. As a writer and blogger, I’m occasionally compelled to express an original thought or opinion that I think is uniquely my own. However, we work in a world where everything comes from somewhere and there are many contributors who I trust and rely upon for advice and cutting-edge information. This “corner” of my blog is to highlight these community contributions that I find informative.

James Serra, Microsoft Solution Architect and former Data Platform MVP, continues a deep expose’ of Azure Synapse Analytics, with the sixth post in the series. This new Azure service headlined at both Ignite and PASS Summit, currently in Preview from Microsoft, is the evolution of the modern data warehouse. Azure Synapse Analytics is an orchestration of services including Azure SQL Data Warehouse, Data Bricks Data Lake Gen2. It will be an important consideration for serious cloud-based BI, analytics and data warehouse solutions at enterprise scale.

Azure Synapse Analytics & Power BI performance
Azure Synapse Analytics new features
Azure SQL Data Warehouse Gen2 announced
Azure SQL Database vs SQL Data Warehouse
What is Microsoft Azure Stream Analytics?
Azure Synapse Analytics & Power BI concurrency

Marco Russo, a name synonymous with DAX and BI expertise, captures what happened in the DAX world in 2019 in a an aptly-named blog post: “What has happened in the DAX world in 2019” :-). He also writes “I’ve seen the future, and it’s bright – but unfortunately, it’s under NDA!” and actually goes on to describe some of the announcements expected in the next year and major conference events.

David Eversveld, Data Platform MVP, writes about improvements to the Power BI theme capabilities. In addition to the new design ribbon in Power BI Desktop, themes can be exported from the designer. Adding to his collection of reference material that I have found valuable in my Power BI toolbelt, David posted this data color reference to assist with color selection for reports.

The new Power BI Activity Log was announced this month. This will make it easier to capture and monitor user and report activity. It also simplifies Power BI tenant administration by isolating report activity from Office 365 events and other log events. Power BI started out as an extension of Office 365 and SharePoint Online services but not all organizations use or manage Office 365 and Power BI under the same administration role. Microsoft continues to deliver on the promise to provide comprehensive automation APIs and tooling for administration.

The consistent contributions of Guy In A Cube’s Adam Saxton and Patrick LeBlanc are too numerous to mention. Notably, they were awarded the “Most Helpful Data Video Channel” by Data Literacy Awards. Data Literacy LLC is a Seattle-based training and education company founded by Ben Jones.

A Conversation with Ásgeir Gunnarsson about Power BI in the Enterprise

As I continue to explore and develop best practices for managing serious business-scale Power BI solutions, I’m having conversations with recognized community leaders. Last month I chatted with Ásgeir Gunnarsson on the SQL Train ride from Portland to PASS Summit in Seattle. Ásgeir is a data platform MVP and seasoned Business Intelligence expert from Reykjavik, Iceland who works as Chief Consultant for Datheos, a Microsoft-focused BI and Analytics consultancy in Copenhagen. He leads the Icelandic Power BI User Group and PASS Chapter.

He gave an inspiring presentation at Oregon SQL Saturday about Enterprise Power BI Development. You can view his presentation deck from the Schedule page here.

Ásgeir talked primarily about the development life cycle for for projects centered around Power BI, data and object governance. As I’ve mentioned in my earlier posts on this topic, the development experience for BI projects in general is different from application development and database projects and you cannot use the same management tools – at least not in the same way. He promoted using OneDrive for Business to manage version control.

He shared several excellent resources, many of which I either use or have evaluated, to help manage Power BI projects. The ALM Toolkit is a useful tool for comparing objects in great detail between two PBIX files. Ásgeir also show some efforts from community contributors to automate change-tracking file-level source control (which really made the point that it’s a difficult thing to do with Power BI). We know that Microsoft are working on an integrated release management solution for the Power BI service which may amend or replace the need for existing tools.

Guidance for publishing and management the life cycle for Power BI solutions included deployment automation using OneDrive and PowerShell. Using multiple workspaces for development, testing and pre-production; deployment can be managed using the Power BI REST APIs and PowerShell script, which is detailed in this tutorial. These PowerShell examples demonstrate how to clone workspace content, publish files and rebind data sources.

Regarding governance and security, he made reference to the extensive Microsoft whitepaper: Planning a Power BI Enterprise Deployment. He steps-through diagrams that help simplify each of the important processes and tasks for developing, deploying and managing Power BI solutions.

If you need to manage Power BI solutions, I encourage you to review his presentation and you can connect with Ásgeir on LinkedIn and Twitter.