Interviews with Microsoft Data Community Speakers and Leaders

What is the key to advancing your career in the Microsoft data platform?  Here is some advice from some of the most successful people in the industry…

Every year we have some big community events that bring together community leaders from all over.  These are international user group and community leaders who write books and speak at conferences. we had our local Oregon SQL Saturday “SQL Train” which is a chartered train – some coaches that one of our speaker’s chartered to bring all of our speakers and attendees up to the PASS summit after Oregon SQL Saturday, and then the big PASS summit (the big conference up in Seattle). I had a chance to sit down with a number of our speakers, community leaders and attendees and just ask questions about what brought them there, and advice that they would give people in the industry about how to get the most value out of that experience …and this is what they said:

Well-run monthly user group meetings and big annual events local events like SQL Saturday don’t just happen by themselves. It takes a lot of planning, a lot of volunteers and a lot of coordination to make these events successful. Part of that effort are the annual leadership planning meetings that we have during the week of PASS summit. Here are some short clips from those meetings where several hundred local leaders from all over the world got together to share ideas, to exchange notes and to coordinate to be able to make these events successful. Leaders cross-pollinate, exchange ideas and they work together to make this a great community. Why? …because somebody did that for us when we were getting started and we want to give back to the community. So, get involved; join the leadership committees at your local user groups, volunteer at SQL Saturday. Volunteer to do a short speaking engagement. Just get up and talk to some of your peers. Get started by volunteering in the community so that you can be part of the ongoing great community we have around the Microsoft data platform.

Modern Reporting with SSRS 2016 & 2017, and Report Tool Options – PASS Sessions

It’s official.  The PASS Summit schedule was announced and I will be doing three sessions:  A full-day preconference, a regular session and a panel discussion with other industry professionals.  Come back to this post for follow-up information and selections of content from these sessions after the event.

The PASS Summit is my favorite event of the year and I always leave with so much valuable insight and information.  PASS is my annual battery recharge for the rest of the year.  It is a vibrant community of professionals and industry leaders who love to share and exchange learnings.  Not just an opportunity to attend sessions presented by top-notch experts and product owners from Microsoft but Summit presents many real opportunities to sit and talk, meet and socialize with these industry influencers.  My perspectives change and I go back to my clients, classrooms and projects with solutions and a fresh new approach.  I’ve been going to the PASS Summit for twelve years and every year is literally the best Summit ever.  In the industry, there is no better investment of time and energy compared with what you will gain by attending.  I look forward to meeting many of you at Summit.  Please introduce yourself and say ‘Hello’. Continue reading

Modern Reporting with SQL Server 2016 and 2017 Reporting Services full day pre-conference session

I am thrilled to be presenting a full-day preconference session before the PASS Summit, on October 31st.  Please join me for a deep tour of the new capabilities and BI platform integrations for SQL Server Reporting Services 2016 & 2017.  The session will also review the essential skills and tasks to setup and configure the report server and web portal, report design and modern report solution planning. Continue reading

Creating a Business Intelligence Solution with D&B Business Data & Excel 2013 BI Tools

This series of video sessions will demonstrate how to create a business intelligence solution with sets of business data from multiple sources.  In the first session, I import business records from 5 different D&B data feeds using the Windows Azure Marketplace with desktop BI tools in Excel 2013 ProPlus.  In future sessions, I will combine public data sets, use features of Power BI and migrate to an enterprise scale BI solution with SQL Server, SSAS tabular and SharePoint.

D&B data fees in the Windows Azure Marketplace can be used to get detailed, current demographic and financial information about specific businesses or companies in different regions and categories.  These business records can be used for things like market analysis, sales, verification and research.

Session 1 – Getting started (48:00)
Analyzing Dunn & Bradstreet business records data from the Windows Azure Marketplace
using Excel 2013 Power Query, Power Pivot and Power View to create a basic dashboard

To watch this video with more playback controls, you can also view it on ScreenCast here.

Session 2 – Enhancing the Solution (32:00)
Combining Dunn & Bradstreet Customer Records with Public & Enterprise Data
Geographic visualization with Power Map, publishing to Power BI and using Q&A to search a model with natural language

FirstFrame

 

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Book Review of Microsoft Tabular Modeling Cookbook

by Paul te Braak, from Packt Publishing
on Amazon

Good technology books usually come in one of two forms.  Some of the books on my shelves go deep technically, contain useful tidbits of code but read like the phonebook.  Just a few are interesting and insightful.  This book is a rare gem that does both.  Paul te Braak is well-known in the Business Intelligence community for his expertise and contributions and he delivers a unique guide that starts with the basics and proceeds to cover all of the essentials with depth and practical examples to solve some challenging business problems.

You might expect a book that introduces fundamental concepts to gloss-over advanced topics and avoid complex applications.  This book covers the essentials of data modeling and analysis with Excel and Power Pivot in language that is plain and easy to understand but it doesn’t stop with the basics.  It covers practical and useful applications without insulting the reader’s intelligence.  As an experienced data modeler, I found several useful techniques and new methods to use the tools and language.  Paul’s coverage of practical techniques spans the spectrum of business applications and product features.  This is a rare book that is not only a good tutorial with many hands-on examples that can be repeated by the reader but it’s also a great reference of useful techniques and code samples.

Highlights include:

  • The integration of Excel features such as ranges, tables, pivot tables and pivot charts with the additional features of Power Pivot and Power View that extend and enhance these capabilities
  • Examples and instructions are directed at Excel 2010 users and the author compares some the different features in Excel 2010 and Excel 2013.
  • Fundamentals of the DAX calculation language
  • Importing data as text, different date formats and implied data type columns
  • Beyond the basics, a schema.ini file is used to define column data types
  • Importing data from a database, working with database tables, views and queries, managing connections and challenges encountered running the table import wizard multiple times
  • Data feeds using OData and using a Reporting Services report to provide a data feed
  • Decisions a designer makes to enable the user’s experience when browsing a model.  This includes sorting values, navigating hierarchies that enable drill-down interaction. 
  • DAX “X” functions (SUMX, MINX, etc.) to perform row-level aggregation
  • Working with parent-child hierarchies using specialized DAX path functions. 
  • Advanced browsing features, adjusting pivot table options to optimize the user experience
  • Building and using KPIs and using alternate table relationships
  • Time calculations and date functions.  This chapter covers running totals and totals to date
  • Date part aggregate functions (MTD, YTD, etc.),
  • Essential data math and comparisons
  • LastYear and PriorPeriod functions, TotalYTD
  • Manufacturing calendar, working with “445” dates
  • Creating a dynamic relative time measure, using a shell dimension table
  • Using DatesBetween to show the average value for the past 10 days
  • Apply advanced modeling technique to bin, sort and rank values for reporting
  • Expand concepts introduced in chapter 3, using the DAX “X” functions to perform row iteration in advanced financial applications
  • Defining and working with many-to-many relationships.  This is often no trivial task to completely understand many-to-many relationship requirements and to apply a working solution that provides the intended results
  • Addressing inventory and stock-keeping challenges
  • Conditional aggregation at different levels
  • Budgeting and forecasting vs actuals
  • Programming Excel to enhance the users experience
  • Excel VBA event programming to respond to slicers
  • Using cube functions
  • Interacting with charts and slicers
  • Building solutions for the enterprise
  • Using the SSDS Tabular designer
  • Migrating Power Pivot models to Tabular server solutions
  • managing connections, implementing impersonation, managing security
  • Using roles and perspectives
  • Generating and using XMLA script
  • Defining and implementing role-based, dynamic row filtering
  • Performing currency conversion
  • Managing and optimizing  a Tabular solution
  • Deployment scenarios
  • Using SSDT to deploy and process models
  • Using the SSAS Deployment Wizard
  • Generating and using deployment scripts
  • Creating and managing partitions
  • Scheduling and executing processing tasks
  • Utilizing DirectQuery for real-time data results
  • Using Profiler to troubleshoot and optimizing a model
  • Querying a model using DAX
  • comparison of similar and different concepts in multidimensional and Tabular semantic models
  • Query with MDX
  • Query with DAX
  • DAX tools and debugging techniques
  • Using DAX query techniques to simulate SQL query operations
  • Column aliases, joins, filters, deriving tables
  • Samples and top ranked results
  • Using Power View to present results and visualize data
    • Essential design features
    • creating a table report
    • using a matrix to pivot results
    • time and data filters
    • advanced filters
    • creating charts
    • bar charts
    • stacked charts
    • cluster chart
    • using tiles to navigate sectioned results
    • using images
    • managing tables with default field sets
    • table behavior and cards
    • data categories and visual behaviors
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